Workshop Details
Competing Interactions and Colossal Responses in Transition Metal Compounds
07/16/2006 - 07/22/2006
Meeting Description:

One of the most compelling themes to emerge in materials science recently is the degree to which materials properties are dramatically enhanced in the presence of finely balanced competing interactions. Nowhere is this more evident than in transition metal oxides and related compounds, which display
a remarkable variety of phenomena that may be ascribed to
length scales in the presence of such competition is a key challenge in condensed matter physics, and forms the subject of the workshop on "Competing Interactions and Colossal Responses in Transition Metal Compounds".

This workshop is the fourth in a highly successful series of workshops that have been held in Telluride since 1998. Initially, they focussed on the physics of colossal magnetoresistive manganites, but as the subject has evolved, the links with the physics of other transition metal oxides and related compounds have become clearer and so the scope of the workshops has broadened.

The goals of the workshop are as follows:
1) To disseminate the most recent results in the physics of transition metal oxides and related compounds.
2) To provide a forum to discuss the underlying principles that govern the colossal response of materials subjected to strongly competing interactions.
3) To identify future directions for research in these materials.
4) To encourage new collaborations among experimental and/or theoretical programs among universities and national laboratories, and to strengthen ongoing collaborations.

Notes:

The workshop format will be similar to the popular Gordon Research Conferences, allowing for intensive discussion after each presentation, as well as for general topical discussions. This format will consist of morning sessions with 30-minute presentations, followed by free afternoons and
informal evening discussion periods. The experience from the previous workshops demonstrated that this approach was not only highly effective, but also extremely well-received by all participants. The environment in Telluride fosters free and open interactions.

PARTICIPANTS:
Subhendra D. Mahanti mahanti@pa.msu.edu
Norman Mannella NMannella@lbl.gov
Yusuke Tokunaga yusuke-tokunaga@aist.go.jp
John Mitchell mitchell@anl.gov
Jeffrey Lynn Jeff.Lynn@nist.gov
Brian Sales salesbc@ornl.gov
Ray Osborn ROsborn@anl.gov
Christoph Renner c.renner@ucl.ac.uk
Chris Leighton leighton@umn.edu
Guangyong Xu gxu@bnl.gov
Christie Nelson csnelson@bnl.gov
Jaime Fernandez-Baca jfn@ornl.gov
Frank Bridges bridges@physics.ucsc.edu
Maria Varela mvarela@ornl.gov
Daniel Khomskii khomskii@ph2.uni-koeln.de
Adriana Moreo amoreo@utk.edu
Antoine Maignan antoine.maignan@ensicaen.fr
Matthew Stone stonemb@ornl.gov
Yeong-Ah Soh yeong-ah.soh@dartmouth.edu
Stephan Rosenkranz srosenkranz@anl.gov
Toby Perring t.g.perring@rl.ac.uk
Gonzalo Alvarez gz1@ornl.gov
Laurent Chapon L.C.Chapon@rl.ac.uk
Phillip Duxbury duxbury@pa.msu.edu
Kenneth Gray kengray@anl.gov
Michael Norman norman@anl.gov
John Freeland freeland@anl.gov
Despina Louca louca@virginia.edu
Seunghun Lee shlee@virginia.edu
Emil Bozin bozin@pa.msu.edu
Simon Billinge billinge@pa.msu.edu

Meeting Venue:

Telluride Intermediate School
725 West Colorado Telluride CO 81435

Telluride Science Research Center
Post Office Box 2429, Telluride CO 81435
Tel: + 970.708.4426
Email: info@telluridescience.org
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